Archive of: 2014

  • New Year, New Resolutions

    New Year, New Resolutions As we start the New Year, individuals across the globe set new resolutions, reflect on the outcomes of prior resolutions, and look forward to the year ahead. Many folks make health related resolutions such as exercising at least 3 times a week, or reaching 10,000 steps per day. Perhaps the resolution is broader - say to do something new every month. We might even decide that this is the year for no resolutions at all because we “fail” at them by February anyways.

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  • Annual Fundraiser Lunch for Literacy Connects of Tucson

    Annual Fundraiser Lunch for Literacy Connects of Tucson Packed house at the Literacy Connects annual fundraiser lunch! LeCroy & Milligan Associates was happy to have sponsored a table for the second year in a row. Aside from being one of our important clients, this nonprofit provides numerous literacy services to the families of Tucson. It’s a great cause and we are proud supporters!

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  • Measuring Program Outcomes: Too Often we Use the Wrong Measures

    Measuring Program Outcomes: Too Often we Use the Wrong Measures One of the biggest challenges facing the program evaluator is finding a good outcome measure. This is the bread and butter of program evaluation. To demonstrate that a program is beneficial one must measure outcomes, that is, capture the change that takes place with participants. Whatever changes that take place they must be measured and quantified.

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  • United Way Days of Caring Event with the Ishashitaa Refugee Network

    United Way Days of Caring Event with the Ishashitaa Refugee Network This year, LeCroy & Milligan Associates signed up to work with the Ishashitaa Refugee Network for the annual "Days of Caring" event with United Way. We joined United Nations refugees for a morning of harvesting and learning about fall food resources. Pumpkins and squash, highly nutritious and long-lasting, go to waste in the USA by the millions of pounds each year.

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  • Using Implementation Science to Measure Fidelity

    Using Implementation Science to Measure Fidelity A fundamental need of programs that use evidence-based practices is to assess whether or not the practice (such as a school curriculum or a home visitation model) is delivered with fidelity. "James Bell Associates (2009) defines fidelity as “the extent to which the delivery of an intervention adheres to the protocol or program model as intended by the developers of the intervention.”

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  • A Framework for Validating Child Care Quality Improvement Standards

    A Framework for Validating Child Care Quality Improvement Standards Recently, child care quality rating and improvement systems have become popular in many states as a policy tool to improve the quality of child care programs and settings with the goal of improving outcomes in areas such as school readiness.

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  • The Benefits of an Internship in Research & Program Evaluation

    The Benefits of an Internship in Research & Program Evaluation Taking an internship in a research and evaluation company specializing in program evaluation is very different experience from what I expect my other business school peers are likely pursuing. But I have valued the nontraditional route to understand business.

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  • Thoughts on the Usefulness of Evaluation

    Thoughts on the Usefulness of Evaluation In our work with clients we strive to find ways for the results of our evaluation activities to be used or at least provide opportunities for learning. According to feedback we receive from our clients, more often than not we are successful. However, too often than I would like to admit that is not the case and we are not alone…there is empirical evidence hiding out here and there as to why managers either don’t do evaluations or don’t use the results when they are done.

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  • “I need to prove that my program makes a difference!”

    “I need to prove that my program makes a difference!” When I first started working in program evaluation, I used to get pretty jazzed by that sentiment. After some time went by and I was more “experienced”, I would hear this and I felt less positive and started to get pretty anxious. I got overwhelmed by the not at all carefully considered reasons why this unique, singular program may not have much influence at all on anyone.

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