New Year, New Resolutions




As we start the New Year, individuals across the globe set new resolutions, reflect on the outcomes of prior resolutions, and look forward to the year ahead. Many folks make health related resolutions such as exercising at least 3 times a week, or reaching 10,000 steps per day. Perhaps the resolution is broader – say to do something new every month. We might even decide that this is the year for no resolutions at all because we “fail” at them by February anyways.

But what if we decided to look at resolutions and goals in a new way? What if we saw them as just one component of a plan to improve our quality of life? When we have an illness or a disease, the doctor will often prescribe more than one treatment to help heal our bodies and improve our quality of life. These treatments are evaluated for their effectiveness to determine which ones are most beneficial to us. If one of those treatments doesn’t help, it’s that the treatment wasn’t the right fit for us. New treatment options can be added or used to replace ineffective treatments. And the evaluation process continues throughout treatment.

The same methods can be used to evaluate our own goals and resolutions to look beyond failure or success. What action steps did we put in place to make progress towards our goal? What obstacles are getting in the way of following through with our resolution? Are there other options which would improve the chance of success? Rather than declaring a resolution a failure or giving up on a goal, take the time to evaluate what worked and what didn’t and use that information to modify your process or even the goal itself.

Just as we encourage companies and agencies to evaluate their programs and processes, we also encourage individuals to take time for reflection of their past efforts and use that information to help guide their goals and activities for the year. Evaluation provides that opportunity for reflection by looking at the both the process and the outcomes involved in programs, activities, agencies, and most importantly individuals.

Happy New Year from all of us at LeCroy & Milligan Associates.



About the Author:
Darlene Lopez, Ph.D.c is a Senior Evaluation Associate with LeCroy & Milligan Associates, Inc. She has conducted research in a number of areas including: home visitation, teacher professional development, health systems development, criminal justice, substance abuse treatment, science and media literacy, delayed language, community-based programs, alcohol education, health education, developmental disabilities, and health disparities. Ms. Lopez has extensive experience in projects that require both outcome and process evaluation.

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New Year, New Resolutions




As we start the New Year, individuals across the globe set new resolutions, reflect on the outcomes of prior resolutions, and look forward to the year ahead. Many folks make health related resolutions such as exercising at least 3 times a week, or reaching 10,000 steps per day. Perhaps the resolution is broader – say to do something new every month. We might even decide that this is the year for no resolutions at all because we “fail” at them by February anyways.

But what if we decided to look at resolutions and goals in a new way? What if we saw them as just one component of a plan to improve our quality of life? When we have an illness or a disease, the doctor will often prescribe more than one treatment to help heal our bodies and improve our quality of life. These treatments are evaluated for their effectiveness to determine which ones are most beneficial to us. If one of those treatments doesn’t help, it’s that the treatment wasn’t the right fit for us. New treatment options can be added or used to replace ineffective treatments. And the evaluation process continues throughout treatment.

The same methods can be used to evaluate our own goals and resolutions to look beyond failure or success. What action steps did we put in place to make progress towards our goal? What obstacles are getting in the way of following through with our resolution? Are there other options which would improve the chance of success? Rather than declaring a resolution a failure or giving up on a goal, take the time to evaluate what worked and what didn’t and use that information to modify your process or even the goal itself.

Just as we encourage companies and agencies to evaluate their programs and processes, we also encourage individuals to take time for reflection of their past efforts and use that information to help guide their goals and activities for the year. Evaluation provides that opportunity for reflection by looking at the both the process and the outcomes involved in programs, activities, agencies, and most importantly individuals.

Happy New Year from all of us at LeCroy & Milligan Associates.



About the Author:
Darlene Lopez, Ph.D.c is a Senior Evaluation Associate with LeCroy & Milligan Associates, Inc. She has conducted research in a number of areas including: home visitation, teacher professional development, health systems development, criminal justice, substance abuse treatment, science and media literacy, delayed language, community-based programs, alcohol education, health education, developmental disabilities, and health disparities. Ms. Lopez has extensive experience in projects that require both outcome and process evaluation.

Categories